7 songs that were much better than the films they were promoting

A great soundtrack accompanying a great film is a uniquely satisfying experience. This can be anything from As Time Goes By in Casablanca to Don’t You Forget About Me in The Breakfast Club. It could be the Mortal Kombat soundtrack (I won’t have a word said against those films!), or it could be Michael Giacchino’s superlative score to Up.

Sometimes, however, there’s a mismatch between the quality of the music and the quality of the film. The promotional single – usually released in advance – might have you all fired up, only to face disappointment when you watch the movie. So here’s a shout-out to some memorable music that accompanied some pretty forgettable films.

Continue reading

#musicmonday : Rockabye Baby – Lullaby (The Cure)

Indoctrinating the sprog. It’s part of the reasons we have kids, isn’t it? To fill their tiny brains with the “proper” sort of education. Naturally, with such wilful parents, it’s sod’s law that Princess Jr will rebel against us by listening to Coldplay and insipid boy bands, but one does what one can. *sniff*

So I used my Amazon vouchers from work to go on an MP3 spree and make a compilation of tracks by Rockabye Baby. You’ve probably heard of this lot by now, even if you don’t have spawn: they make “lullaby-style” covers of rock songs, turning even the most noisy Metallica track and turning it into a pretty blend of tinkles and chimes.

Here’s one of my favourite purchases: their version of the appropriately-named Lullaby by The Cure.
Continue reading

#musicmonday – 5 love songs

Love. As in those horrid soppy love songs. It’s all a lot of b*llocks, really. The most ridiculous argument I’ve heard recently is whether a woman should be disappointed if her man hasn’t said “I love you” after six months. I pretty much figured he should know after a few weeks – but know what, exactly? Is there even really any such thing?

Let’s not beat around the bush here: most of what we call “love” is not wanting to die alone and be eaten by cats. All those fluttery, heart-skippy feelings are chemical dictators imploring us to find a friend we like the idea of f***ing and tactfully overlooking everything we find annoying about them for long enough that we can entice them into a legally-binding contract not to skip town if offspring arrive, and of putting up with their s*** until you’re old and grey and get to be eaten by cats together.

The first time you say “I love you” is the moment when you realise that all their irritating habits are just endearing little quirks. If you wait to say “I love you” until you mean it in the grown up sense – when you find yourself doing some tedious household chore that you think is pointless and doesn’t need to be done but you’ll do it because he wants you to do it and he hasn’t even asked but you’ll do it anyway just to see him smile – hell, that s*** takes years. That’s the kind of love that develops after you’ve been married five years. Love is a verb. It’s not really a feeling at all. It’s the kind actions that come naturally when you’re putting someone else’s needs above your own. Still wanting to sleep with the guy after a decade isn’t “love”, that’s just “good taste”.

Continue reading

#trendingtopics – Music Shuffle

From Facebook:
Time for another one of these.
Write down the first 25 random songs that come up on your MP3 player, iPod etc. I used Last.fm set to My Library station.
No cheating!
No editing!

I thought I’d give it a go, using Last.fm, just to see what would happen. I found it interesting because it was forcing me to listen to things that I hadn’t heard in a while or given a particularly fair listen, and playing things out of the context of how I usually hear them. There’s some good songs here …

1. Foetus – Verklemmt

Bit of a no-brainer for me, considering how much I’ve been listening to this lately. I find the video hard-going (made by Alex Winter from Bill & Ted, it’s got literally thousands of cuts), but it’s a great song from the album GASH.

.

2. The Kinks – Dead End Street

Ah, I never tire of this song. I used to play it a lot when I was unemployed and starving-broke, living in a miserable bedsit in one of the rougher parts of South London.

.

Continue reading

Cheer up …

A tweet yesterday asking for mood-improving music made me think about the subtle differences between things that can make you feel better and things that can make you feel worse. Everybody is different, so what works for me might not work for you, but broadly these are the things that really help if you’re feeling a bit Mondayish.

MUSIC

I generally look for “someone who’s more unhappy than I am”, but Liz’s link to Swans made me feel about a billion times worse. That’s probably why I never really got into them, even though I think the music is good.

The trick is for there to be an “up” in the “down”. The reason why tracks like NIN’s Hurt are so popular is because they end on a note of optimism – yes, life sucks, but we’ll get through it. I love Pink Floyd, but that’s because after enough guitar solos you’ve forgotten whatever it was you were upset about in the first place. I basically love music that jumps right down into the hole with you and then pulls you up by the heartstrings.

.

.

I used to listen to Nick Cave a lot because “he’s someone more miserable than I am”, but really the appeal is that there’s an element of parody to what he does. Take a song like (my favourite) Weeping Song. For a song about crying, they actually look extremely bloody cheerful. He’s so completely enjoying himself there that you can’t help but smile.

.

.

Yes, The Cure work too, for exactly the same reasons. Even better was The Mary Whitehouse Experience‘s take on Robert Smith.

.

.

Continue reading